Week 2: Further engagement with direct marketing

The issue with direct marketing, via email is that it's actually not very personal at all. Jonah Berger introduces six excellent points in which current direct marketing should integrate in their strategies. 

One of the points he brought up, was the fact that there needs to be relevance. There needs to be a reason for me to sign upper the newsletter or the weekly, sometimes daily emails that companies send out. I definitely wouldn't mind learning something valuable when opening up an email, alongside an exclusive offer or incentive. It could be something as small as, "Did you know Starbucks started as a small corner coffee shop in Seattle?" Even tying it into his last point, about story telling, if it is a compelling message, or even an anecdote that is relevant and still interesting enough then I will be more likely to share it with peers.

One tactic that I have learned in my current job is adding a share to calendar feature, which once on your phone, can be shared amongst friends whether the user is using an IOS device or Android. The simplicity of this is that it's a feature already pre-installed on their phone, instead of having to download an additional app. It's very easy to implement within emails, and easy to share with friends as well. We are a generation that will delete many emails without even reading them though, however when it comes to notifications on our devices it's a short and sweet reminder of something that can effect your day. Below is an example sent to me from Starbucks...

I did actually share this with a friend as well. I thought it was very well done, good use of bold text, and short and sweet to have in an email. The calendar invite as well is recognizable, but not urging you to download the calendar event it's simply enticing. In terms of the example fitting with the STEPPS model, it speaks mainly to the practical value component. It's practical, to have reminders and calendar events set up on your phone, and practical of course to save money. For an incentive that is time sensitive, the platform of adding to calendar works extremely well. The consistency between operating systems, desktop and mobile, are both applied in this scenario. And there is actually multiple ways to share the content, the email could be forewarned, or the calendar event could be shared amongst contacts. 

Even in the copy "Half off any flavour you like." is a lot more personal and enticing than simply saying "any flavour," or "every flavour." It gets the audience thinking about what is in fact their favourite flavour...

I believe effective copywriting will be crucial when dealing with direct marketing. Often at times i receive emails and in the subject line is a clear indicator that there is a tactic of inserting your name, with a comma and followed by the subject line. Sometimes it doesn't come off as being authentic, or maybe it was at first and then every company started doing it. Recently, thos are the ones I have started ignoring, as well as ones that use emojis. I wrote this tweet a while ago and it seemed to resonate with people as well...

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Just for the record, don't have a huge following on Twitter so at least one person liked it...

I just personally think emojis are lazy when trying to think about what an ad should dictate or in this situation, the subject of an email. When attempting to be as clear and concise as possible, please stray away from emojis. 

There is a lot to learn sometimes from the large companies, such as Starbucks, who manages their social media and direct marketing very well. As millennials, the less paper being used the better. If I have to print out a coupon instead of it being accessible on my phone then the likelihood of me using it is slim to none. I even prefer to put tickets, boarding passes, and coupons through the mobile "Wallet" application on my phone so that it is readily accessible. Some businesses are implementing this, and I understand from my technical background that it is harder than just saying it will be done, the permissions are difficult to achieve - but again, using any resource which the target will likely already have, instead of downloading a new app for example, will increase shareability and likelihood to actually use in our daily life.